1783 Studholm Report

transcribed by George H. Hayward

1783 Studholm Report transcribed by George H. Hayward Cataloguing Information
File number: cwa-NB18-1.
Added Entries:Hayward, George H.
Document Source: http://degaulle.hil.unb.ca/genealogy/studholm.html (removed)
Contributed by: Randal W. Oulton on 12/21/97 at 09:46 PM
Description: covers the state of land grants in New Brunswick in 1783. Also covers rebels, etc..
The people who prepared the original report were: Ebenezer Foster, Fyler Dibblee, James White, Gervis Say.
There are two sets of records for each grouping. The first is a report on the settlers; the second hold comments on some of these settlers. I have added links to the first, which follow here, and the links to the latter, will be from the title bars of each section.

[Webmaster’s note: The only people I chose to list from the original report were the French Inhabitants]

St. Johns River, June 30th, 1783.

To Major G. Studholm, Commandant at Fort Howe, &c.

Sir: --Agreeable to your instructions of the 15th inst. we proceeded up the River St. Johns on the 24th, and have endeavoured in the most accurate manner to collect the best information that was possible respecting the titles claims, characters, principles and deserts of those people who are settled on the lands commonly known by the appellation of Amesbury Tract, the Townships of Gage, Burton, Sunbury, New Town and the lands formerly granted to one McNutt, and after full examination report as follows:

French Inhabitants

1. Joseph Masrol has a wife and one child. Been on about 14 years; considerable improvements.

2. Daniel Gauden, wife and 9 children. Been on 16 years; considerable improvements.

3. Jean Baptiste Daigle, wife and 4 children. Been on 14 years; considerable improvements.

4. Mathurin Gautro, wife and 6 children. Been on 4 years; considerable improvements.

5. Jean Martin has a wife and 5 children, a house and a barn and about 10 acres of cleared land. Says he came on about 15 years past by liberty from Mr. Collins of Canada, and that during the late troubles he gave notice to Major Studholme of the movement of the rebels.

6. Simon Martin, wife and 3 children. Been on 15 years; considerable improvements; claims as above.

7. Joseph Martin, wife and 4 children. Been on 25 years; considerable improvements; claims as above.

8. Francis Martin, wife and 4 children. Been on 15 years; considerable improvements. Says be served as a guide, etc.

9. Amant Martin has a wife and children. Been on the river 15 years; made considerable improvements. Says he was loyal and gave intelligence.

10. Jean Baptiste Gauden has a wife and 5 children. Been on 4 years; considerable improvements. Says he served in Canada.

11. Alexander Gauden, wife and 2 children. Been on 4 years; considerable improvements.

12. Joseph Doucett, wife and 3 children. Been on 20 years; considerable improvements.

13. Joseph Herbert, wife and 3 children. Been on 14 years. Says he served as a pilot.

14. Joseph Daigle, wife and 4 children. Been on 14 years. Carried expresses.

15. Bernard Sabris, wife and four children. Been on 4 years. Lives on Musquash Island.

16. Jean Herbert, wife and 5 children. Been on 14 years; considerable improvements.

17. Oliver Cire, wife and 2 children. Been on 15 years; considerable improvements. Says he was pilot to Major Studholme.

18. Francis Gaudin has a wife. Been on the river 4 years, considerable improvements.

19. Pierre Herbert, wife and 3 children. Been on 10 years. One or two acres cleared.

20. Alexandre Hahiot, wife and 7 children. Been on 3 years; six or seven acres cleared.

21. Paul Cire, wife and 1 child. Been on 16 years; about 8 or 10 acres cleared.

22. Jean Baptiste Cire, wife and 7 children. Been on 15 years; eight acres cleared. Assisted Col. Franklin.

23. Francis Cire, wife and 10 children. Been on 15 years; considerable improvements.

24. Pierre Cire, wife and 1 child. Been on 16 years; considerable improvements. Piloted Maj. Studholme, etc.

25. Joseph Turtiot, wife and 9 children. Been on 15 years; considerable improvements.

26. Pierre Masrol, wife and 2 children. Been on 6 years; considerable improvements.

27. Estienne Quesis, wife and two children. Been on 2 years; considerable improvements, about 4 acres.

28. Antoine Gaudin, wife and 9 children. Been on 11 years; considerable improvements.

29. Baptiste Niemo, wife and 3 children. Been on 14 years; considerable improvements.

30. Jacques Cire, wife and 2 children. Been on 15 years; considerable improvements.

31. Alexie Tibeaudo, wife and 5 children. Been on 6 years; considerable improvements.

32. Francois Herbert, wife and 2 children. Been on 14 years; considerable improvements.

33. Paul Masrol has a wife. Been on the river 14 years; about 3 acres cleared.

34. Jacques Cormier, wife and 6 children. Been on 16 years; considerable improvements.

35. Pierre Metier, wife and 3 children. Been on 3 years; about 3 acres cleared. Came from Canada.

36. Amant Landry, wife and 4 children. Been on 7 years; about 6 acres of land cleared.

37. Lonis Lejeune, wife and 3 children. Been on 15 years; considerable improvements.

38. Joseph Roy, wife and 3 children. Been on 15 years; about 15 acres cleared.

39. Pierre Cormier, wife and 3 children. Been on 13 years; 20 acres of cleared land.

40. Joseph Cormier, wife and 3 children. Been on 13 years; considerable cleared land.

41. Joseph Masrol, wife and 8 children. Been on 6 years; about 8 acres cleared.

42. Pierre Cormier, wife and 2 children. Been on 13 years; 6 acres cleared.

43. Joseph Lejeune, wife and 2 children. Been on 3 years; came from Quebec; 4 acres cleared.

44. Francis Cormier, wife and 2 children. Been on 13 years; 7 acres cleared.

45. Pierre Pinette, wife and 7 children. Been on 14 years; 8 acres cleared.

46. Benoit Roy, wife and 5 children. Been on 2 years; 4 acres cleared.

47. Francois Cormier, wife and 4 children. Been on 16 years; 8 acres cleared. Has a title from Lewis Mitchell through Capt. Ferguson, one of the grantees.

48. Pierre Tibeaudo, wife and 1 child. Been on 16 years; 15 acres cleared.

49. Jean Baptiste Cormier, wife and 10 children. Been on 16 years; 12 acres cleared.

50. Amant Cormier, wife and 5 children. Been on 16 years; 15 acres cleared.

51. Augustine Leblanc, wife and one child. Been on 7 years; 9 acres cleared.

52. Francois Maurin, wife and 8 children. Been on 15 years. Has possession on Musquash Island.

53. Joseph Sire, wife and 9 children. Been on 15 years; 30 acres cleared.

54. Baptiste Fournier, wife and 1 child. Been on 2 years. Came from Quebeck.

55. Michael Mercure, wife and 3 children. Been on 14 years; 8 acres clear,

56. Paul Potier has a wife. Been 16 years on the river; 18 acres cleared.

57. Oliver Tibeaudo has a lease from Richard Shorne, Esq., for 999 years. Has large improvements at St. Anns.

58. Oliver Tibeaudo, Jun., wife and 3 children. Been on 6 years; 30 acres cleared.

59. Louis Sausion, wife and 1 child. Been on 5 years; 4 acres cleared.

60. Jean Denoier, wife and 6 children. Been on 2 years; 4 acres cleared.

Louis Mercure, 1 child. Has a good house and about 12 acres of land cleared. Been on about 3 years. Was employed in carrying expresses to Quebec, Penobscot, etc. His character good as a subject, and we beg leave to recommend him in the fullest manner.

The foregoing are settled in the Townships of Sunbury, New Town and McNutts.

We have the honor to be, etc.,

Ebenezer Foster,
Fyler Dibble,
James White,
Gervis Say.
St. John's River, July 14th, 1783.

Sir: --Inclosed we have sent you the remainder of the returns of the Settlers on the River St. John's agreeable to your instructions of June 16th. We have taken pains to collect their several circumstances as correct as possible which has been attended with a great fatigue and considerable expense. We beg leave therefore, to represent, that if it can be allowed, we think a reasonable compensation ought to be allowed us,-- but wish not to make it a burthen to individuals. We were twelve days performing the service.--

We have the honour to be Sir,

Your most obedt. Humble Servants,

Ebenezer Foster,
Fyler Dibblee,
James White,
Gervis Say.
Major G. Studholme.

(French Inhabitants)

5. Jean Martin, who is mentioned in the Report to have given me notice of the movements of the Rebels, was very active on that occasion, and had great merit in exerting himself all in his power for the good of his Majesty's Service.

6. Simon Martin

7. Joseph Martin Are good subjects and were active against the Rebels.

8. Francois Martin

9. Amant Martin

This copyright notice accompanied this article, and still applies: Copyright applies on this material if intended for for-profit or fee-charging uses, and permission from Chignecto and the contributor must be obtained. Otherwise, this material and information is given in perpetuity as a gift to the public domain by the Chignecto Project and may be freely used for all other purposes, including further internet distribution. Please do source it, however, as part of good research practices, and please do credit the contributor for bringing this information to us all.

Map of the 1783 Studholm Report

Map of the Saint John River in the Province of Nova Scotia. Exhibiting The Grants to Officers &c In 1765 With other Patents. From The Survey of Mr. Chas. Morris and Other Surveyors.
Map of the Areas spoken of in this Report

Editor's note: When the decision was taken by England at the close of the Revolutionary War to evacuate New York, several thousand Loyalists were shipped to Nova Scotia, which then included roughly the area occupied by the present provinces of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. In 1784, that part of Nova Scotia which lay north of the Bay of Fundy was set off as a new Province of New Brunswick, the dividing line being established at the Isthmus of Chignecto just north of the present town of Amherst. During the War the settlers on the Bay of Fundy were often pillaged and plundered by Rebel privateers from down the coast, mainly out of Machias, Maine, and the trading post at the mouth of the Saint John River operated by James Simonds, William Hazen and James White, was particularly vulnerable.

Rev. William O. Raymond, LL.D., F.R.S.C., in The River St. John, ed. Dr. J.C. Webster, C.M.G., (1910; Sackville, N.B.: The Tribune Press, rpt. 1943), tells us that "late in the autumn (of 1778) an American sloop carrying eight guns entered the harbour. Her Captain, A. Greene Crabtree, proved the most unwelcome and rapacious visitor that had yet appeared. Many of the settlers fled to the woods to escape the vandalism of his crew. From the store at Portland Point 21 boat loads of goods was taken. The plunder included a lot of silver ornaments, fuzees and other articles left by the Indians as pledges for their debts."

Following that incident, William Hazen proceeded to Windsor, N.S., and urgently demanded protection. Col. Small, of the Royal Highland Emigrants, accompanied him to Halifax and by their united efforts the British government authorities were convinced of the necessity of immediate action. A considerable body of troops was ordered to the mouth of the river with directions to repair Fort Frederick, which the Rebels had burned in 1775, or build a new fort.

General Massey chose Maj. Guilford Studholm as commander of the expedition. He was a capable officer and had previous experience as a former commander of the Fort Frederick garrison. His knowledge of the St. John River and its inhabitants, both whites and indians, made him particularly well fitted for the post. Maj. Studholm arrived at the mouth of the river during the latter part of November, 1778, with 50 men, a framed block-house and four six-pounders. They came in a sloop of war, which remained in the harbour for their protection until the next spring. He decided against repairing Fort Frederick and commenced immediately to construct a new fort on a new location. It was named Fort Howe.

When the Spring Fleet arrived from New York in May, 1783, Maj. Studholm was still in command of the garrison at Fort Howe. One of the first and most urgent things to do was to find lands for these new arrivals. Much of the best land on the St. John had already been granted. However, a lot of it had been granted in large blocks to propritors who had undertaken to place tenants upon it but had for the most part not been very successful in doing so.

In June, 1783, Maj. Studholm sent a party of four men up the river from Fort Howe with instructions to determine who was settled upon the lands in various townships and what title they had to those lands, if any. Their report to Maj. Studholm, usually referred to by family historians today as "The Studholm Report" is an important historical document. It is, in effect, a heads of households census, and in addition provides information about land title, the loyalty or otherwise of many of the pre-Loyalist inhabitants on the river, etc., that can be found nowhere else.

© Lucie LeBlanc Consentino
Acadian & French Canadian Ancestral Home
2006 - Present

Please Navigate This Web Site
Using The Sidebar To The Left
If You Do Not See A Sidebar Click Here